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ICST Conference

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Panels

Cognitive Radio Spectrum Access: What About QoS Support ?



Organizers

David Grandblaise, (david.grandblaise@motorola.com) and Patricia Martigne, (patricia.martigne@orange-ftgroup.com)


Download the presentations here.

Context

The original cognitive radio paradigm has smoothly and rapidly migrated from initial academic conceptual ideas and studies to some first cognitive radio system designs by communication technologists in both defence (e.g. XG DARPA) and industry (e.g. IEEE 802.16h, IEEE 802.22, P1900, IEEE 802.11y standards). This transition has been facilitated by the policy makers who provided the necessary regulatory playground to make this technology emerge. Referring to the above current IEEE 802.x and P1900 cognitive radio standards developments, targeted applications of cognitive radios are license-exempt (commonly referred as spectrum commons) or secondary usage of licensed spectrum (commonly referred as dynamic spectrum access). Both of these applications fall under the scope of cognitive radio spectrum access field. To the wireless scientists, cognitive radios are expected to be enabled with the necessary functions allowing an efficient opportunistic, altruist usage of spectrum for cognitive radio spectrum access. However, it is unclear how far this opportunism (not necessary predictable) exploited by cognitive radios is compatible with the support of Quality of Service (QoS). In other words, this raises some of the following key questions. Can current technologies provide the support of QoS for cognitive radios operating in a common spectrum or dynamic spectrum access fashions? What are these technologies and how are they addressed in the current standards? What are the technology gaps to be filled? What is the role of the policy makers to facilitate this QoS? Etc.

Panel Objectives

The focus in this session is to discuss how cognitive radios can support QoS when applied to dynamic spectrum access and common spectrum usage cases. The panel session will explore technological and regulatory aspects related to this area. The emphasis will be on the operators', industry and policy makers' point of view. We aim at:

  • discussing the current technical approaches followed in cognitive radio standards to support QoS;
  • discussing technology advances (PHY, MAC, network) which are key technological enablers to support QoS in cognitive radio spectrum access; and
  • discussing economic and policy maker drivers to support QoS for cognitive radio spectrum access.

Panelist

Kiran CHALLAPALI is a Principal Member at Philips Research North America (PRNA). He leads Philips' Cognitive Radio efforts. He is with Philips since 1990, as a project leader since 1998, and has received six group accomplishment awards. His research at Philips has led to significant contributions to the development of the ongoing IEEE 802.22, WiMedia Ultrawideband, IEEE 802.11e (on QoS), ATSC high-definition television and ISO MPEG Video standards. He has published over twenty five technical papers in IEEE Journals and Conferences. He is the recipient of the Chester Sall Award for the Best Transactions Paper (second place) from the IEEE Consumer Electronics Society for a paper published in 1992. He has served on the National Science Foundation NeTS panel for funding research in the Networking area. He has about twenty-five patents, issued or pending, and is a Member of the IEEE. Kiran graduated from Rutgers University with a Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering in 1992, and has pursued further graduate studies at Columbia University. Philips Research NA recently received the 2007 North American Cognitive Networks Excellence in Research of the Year Award from Frost and Sullivan.


Dr. Klaus MOESSNER is a senior research fellow in the Mobile Communications Research Group, at the Centre of Communication Systems Research (CCSR) at the University of Surrey. Klaus earned his Dipl-Ing (FH) at the University of Applied Science in Offenburg, Germany, an MSc from Brunel University, UK and his PhD from the University of Surrey (UK). His main responsibilities within CCSR include conducting research, managing and co-ordinating different research contracts and projects, supervision of PhD and MSc students and teaching courses at postgraduate student level. He coordinates a research team on Software based systems and IP based internetworking technologies in CCSR, managed the workpackage on 'Spectrum Efficient Radio Resource Management' and coordinated the Universities involvement in the FP5 IST-OverDRiVE project. His research into Software Defined Radio and Object-Oriented Technologies for wireless communication systems has brought forward two patents as well as several refereed publications in international journals and at conferences. Klaus currently managed the workpackage on "Evolution of RRM and Spectrum Management" in the FP6 project E2R (End-to-End Reconfigurability) and leads the workpackage on Spectrum and Radio Resource Efficiency in the second phase of this project. He also coordinates the projects regulatory discussions and was invited speaker at regulatory workshops and panel sessions on Cognitive Radio, Software Radio (e.g. First Regulatory Round Table on SDR, SDR Forum, E^2R Workshop, European Wireless 2006, PIMRC 2005 and PIMRC 2006, EW 2007).


John SYDOR is a research manager with the Communications Research Centre (CRC), which is a Canadian Government wireless and optical networks laboratory located in Ottawa, Canada. He holds numerous patents on antenna, mobile satellite, and broadband wireless network technology and has contributed extensively to the ITU and IEEE organizations on matters related to international regulations and wireless standards, especially on those related to the License-Exempt band usage. The group of researchers he leads at CRC have been responsible for producing some of the world's first Wireless Ethernet links and 5 GHz cognitive radio-capable technologies; some of which have seen commercial implementation. Currently his work is focused on implementing low cost Cognitive Radio wireless networking systems based on modified IEEE 802.11 and 16 standards.


Dr. Kazunori TAKEUCHI is the senior manager of the cognitive radio laboratory at KDDI R&D Labs, Saitama Pref., JAPAN. Kazunori earned his BS at the Hokkaido University, JAPAN, and MS from Osaka University, and his PhD from the Waseda University. His main responsibilities are to proceed the project of Cognitive Radio Communication Technical Research funded from Japanese Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications. In the cognitive radio research, he is mainly interested in the sensing and prediction of the radio circumstances and the real capacity of the wireless transmission in an area from the standing point of the application layer. He was joined TOYOTA InfoTechnology Center for several years, he is also interested in the ITS as one of good application of the cognitive radio.


Sharing Spectrum with Television Broadcasters



Organizers

Jon Peha (CMU), Bruce Franca (MSTV), Kiran Challapali (Philips Research), Kyutae Lim (GaTech) and Chuck Jackson


Download the presentations here.

Context

One of the first battlegrounds over the possibility of using cognitive radio for opportunistic access to spectrum is in the use of spectrum that has been allocated to television broadcasters. Both Congress and the Federal Communications Commission have considered proposals to allow other devices to operate on a secondary basis in this band. There has been strong disagreement over the impact this would have on television broadcasts. Even among supporters of this form of sharing, opinions differ on the choice of technology for secondary users, the level of cooperation among devices, and whether secondary devices should be licensed or unlicensed.

Panel Objectives

This panel will discuss the various technical mechanisms and regulatory changes that might allow secondary devices to operate in spectrum used by TV broadcasters, as well as the potential benefits and dangers of these options, and the applications most likely to emerge if these changes are made.

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