ICST Conference
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ICST Conference

research conference europe communications workshop

Tutorials

Date: July 31


T1: Cognitive Networks
T2: Signal Processing Techniques for Spectrum Sensing and Communication in Cognitive Radio Networks

Cognitive Networks (July 31 8:30-12:30)


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Speakers

Luiz A. DaSilva and Allen B. MacKenzie, Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech

Abstract

This tutorial will provide attendees with a critical understanding of the current research on cognitive networks, networks capable of perceiving current network conditions and then planning, learning and acting according to end-to-end goals. Cognitive networks are motivated by the complexity, heterogeneity, and reliability requirements of tomorrow's networks, which are increasingly expected to self-organize to meet user and application objectives. We explore the links between cognitive networks and related research on cognitive radios and cross-layer design. By defining cognitive networks, examining their relationship to other technologies, discussing critical design issues, and providing a framework for implementation, we aim to establish a foundation for further research and discussion.

Bios:

  • Luiz A. DaSilva joined Virginia Tech's Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1998, where he is now an Associate Professor. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Kansas and previously worked for IBM for six years. Dr. DaSilva's research focuses on performance and resource management in wireless and mobile ad hoc networks. He is currently researching the application of game theory to model mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs), topology control, cooperation and reputation management in heterogeneous ad hoc networks, energy-aware multicast route discovery, and cognitive networks. Dr. DaSilva has published over sixty refereed papers in journals and major conferences in the communications and computer areas. Current and recent research sponsors include the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, Booz Allen Hamilton, the U.S. Customs Services, Intel, and Microsoft Research, among others. He is a member of the Wireless @ Virginia Tech research group. Dr. DaSilva is a Senior Member of IEEE, a member of the ASEE and of ACM, and a past recipient of the ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education New Faculty Fellow award. In 2006, he was named a College of Engineering Faculty Fellow at Virginia Tech. He frequently teaches distance and distributed learning courses on network architecture and protocols and on mobile and wireless networking.

  • Allen B.MacKenzie is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering in May 2003 from Cornell University with a dissertation entitled "Game Theoretic Analysis of Power Control and Medium Access Control." Dr. MacKenzie's research focuses on applications of game theory to wireless communications and networking, cognitive radio, and cognitive networks. Current research sponsors include the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Justice. Dr. MacKenzie is a member of the IEEE, ACM, and ASEE. While at Cornell, MacKenzie was an NSF Graduate Research Fellow. In 2006, he received the Virginia Tech College of Engineering Dean's Award for Outstanding New Assistant Professor.

Signal Processing Techniques for Spectrum Sensing and Communication in Cognitive Radio Networks
(July 31 13:30-17:30)


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Speakers

Behrouz Farhang-Boroujeny and Roland Kempter, ECE Dept., Univ of Utah.

Abstract

As the vast majority of the available spectral resources have already been licensed, it appears that there is little or no room to add any new services, unless some of the existing licenses are discontinued. On the other hand, studies have shown that vast portions of the licensed spectra are rarely used. This has initiated the idea of cognitive radio (CR), where secondary (i.e., unlicensed) users are allowed to transmit and receive data over portions of spectra when primary (i.e., licensed) users are inactive. This should be done in a way that the secondary users (SUs) are invisible to the primary users (PUs). The FCC Spectrum Policy task force has already set the rules for the operation of CR networks. Standard working groups, e.g., IEEE 802.22, have also been formed and are currently working on relevant documents or have finalized the standards. This tutorial addresses a range of signal processing tools that are available for both spectral sensing and communications, in CR settings.

Bios:

  • Dr. Behrouz Farhang-Boroujeny received the Ph.D. degree from Imperial College, University of London, UK, in 1981. From 1981 to 1989 he was with the Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran. From 1989 to 2000 he was with the National University of Singapore. Since August 2000, he has been with the University of Utah where he is now a Professor and Associate Chair of the Department. Dr. Farhang-Boroujeny is an expert in the general area of signal processing. He has over 25 years of post PhD experience in teaching and doing research in this field. In the past he has worked in the diverse fields of audio signal processing, magnetic and optical recording channels, CDMA and multicarrier communication systems, MIMO communications, and more recently he has been involved with research related to cognitive radio systems. In this area, his team has studies possible applications of various multicarrier techniques, including the conventional OFDM and filterbank based schemes, in the cognitive radio systems. Their study also includes cross-layer issues in CR networks. Dr. Farhang-Boroujeny has extensively published in the above fields of study, and has been the speaker at numerous conferences and workshops. He has also given numerous invited talks at various institutes/universities around the world. He has over 150 publications including 39 papers in IEEE Transactions on Communications, Signal Processing, and Magnetics. He is the author of the book "Adaptive Filters: theory and applications", John Wiley & Sons, 1998, and is currently working on his second book, titled "Signal Processing Techniques for Software Radio". Dr. Farhang-Boroujeny received the UNESCO Regional Office of Science and Technology for South and Central Asia Young Scientists Award in 1987. He served as associate editor of IEEE Trans. on Signal Processing from July 2002 to July 2005. He has also been involved in various IEEE activities. He was the chairman of the Signal Processing/Communications chapter of the IEEE in Utah from January 2004 to December 2005.
  • Roland Kempter is a Post doctoral fellow in ECE Dept., Univ of Utah.